About HPV Aware

HPV Aware aims to increase awareness of HPV infection and HPV prevention. HPV (human papillomavirus) is an infection which is spread through intimate skin-to-skin contact1.  HPV infection usually clears up by itself but if not, it can cause cancers in both men and women such as anal cancer in men and cervical and anal cancers in women. 

HPV Aware aims to raise awareness of the Irish National HPV Immunisation Programme2a,2b.

In Ireland, from September 2019 the National HPV Immunisation Programme will offer vaccination to all boys and girls in first year of second level schools2c. The vaccine is also offered to certain adults up to the age of 46, who are eligible and at-risk2b. HPV immunisation prevents certain HPV infection which can lead to cancers like cervical cancer and anal cancer2. HPV immunisation is most effective before a person becomes sexually active. For more information about HPV, talk to your healthcare professional.

Read on for more information on HPV.

HPV: Watch & Learn

The HPV vaccine is for both boys and girls3
Almost two thirds of people don’t realise that males and females are at equal risk of HPV infection4
63%
What you need to know about HPV

What you need to know about HPV

What is HPV?
HPV stands for Human Papillomavirus. HPV is a family of very common and highly contagious viruses1.
How does HPV affect males and females?
Males and females can get HPV infection. HPV infection usually clears up by itself but if not, it can cause cancers in both men and women such as anal cancer in men and cervical and anal cancers in women.3.
How is HPV transmitted?
HPV is transmitted through intimate skin-to-skin contact2. It's very common and highly contagious. HPV is so common that almost everyone who is sexually active will get HPV infection at some point in their lifetime2.
What are the symptoms of HPV?
You can't always tell if someone has HPV as most HPV infections don't come with clinical symptoms3. This means that people infected with HPV often don’t know that they have it and can continue transmitting the virus to others3.
If I have HPV infection, will I definitely get cancer?
No. While almost every man and woman will get HPV infection at some point in their lives, HPV infection usually clears up by itself. When HPV infection doesn't clear up by itself, it becomes a problem as it could lead to cancers.
Are HPV-related cancers preventable? Is it possible to help to protect against HPV before being exposed to HPV infection?
In Ireland, from September 2019 the National HPV Immunisation Programme will offer vaccination to all boys and girls in first year of second level schools2c. The vaccine is also offered to certain adults up to the age of 46, who are eligible and at-risk2b. HPV immunisation prevents certain HPV infection which can lead to cancers like cervical cancer and anal cancer2. HPV immunisation is most effective before a person becomes sexually active. 
.
More than half of adults surveyed (56%) don't realise that HPV infection can cause cancer in men4
What you need to know about HPV

HPV Prevention

When was the HPV immunisation programme introduced to Ireland?
The National HPV Immunisation Programme which is run by the National Immunisation Office was introduced to Ireland in 20102a,2b. Please visit www.hpv.ie for more information.
What other countries besides Ireland promote HPV awareness and prevention?
Globally 84 countries have National HPV Immunisation Programmes. Canada, Australia, Switzerland, United States, Austria, Czech Republic and Italy are among those that routinely offer HPV vaccination to both boys and girls.
I still have questions about HPV.
Who should I talk to?
We would recommend you talk to your GP or healthcare professional if you have any questions about HPV or HPV prevention.
Click here to get contact details for your Local Health Centre
bg_map_small 130
Up to 130 men and women die from cancers caused by HPV in Ireland each year5
In Ireland 6,500 cases or pre-cancer of the cervix require treatment each year1